FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

EMERGENCY


What happens if there is a crisis or an emergency? SAVE SOMEBUDDY adheres to the safety and emergency protocols for students and community organization members for each individual school and community organization. Students and community organization members are referred to school and community organization administrators in the event of an emergency. If someone experiences suicidal ideation they may be referred to the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255 or emergency services in their area. The clinicians listed on the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website clinical support page are not available for emergencies or crises, unless they are under the direct care of the clinician. In cases with identified risks for harm to self or others, emergency measures will be taken. 9-1-1 may be called and/or participants will be promptly referred to their nearest Emergency Room for immediate evaluation and treatment by trained medical personnel.




PROGRAM


What is the mission, philosophy, and objectives of the SAVE SOMEBUDDY program? SAVE SOMEBUDDY is for everyone, as it helps us better navigate our human experience through two objectives: reducing everyday stress and improving connection with family and friends. The program enables youth with three readily usable tools: 1. How to break the cycle of self-sabotage 2. How to calm down when feeling upset 3. How to connect with others when feeling despair SAVE SOMEBUDDY is founded on hope, reverses the impact of childhood trauma, and gives children and adults the ability to "save yourself & help a buddy.” We accept the love we believe we deserve. Trauma breaks connection with self, yet love of self and love for others is as vital to our health and wellbeing as food and shelter. Through healthy relationships, we can heal trauma, as compassion and empathy can lift the very weight of the emotional air we breathe. See the research page on the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website and our global page for more information. SAVE SOMEBUDDY is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization with a resilience-focused program centered on the art of peace. We seek to transform families and communities by teaching skills to effectively deal with the neuropsychological and neurophysiological adverse effects of trauma. The intention of SAVE SOMEBUDDY is not to market a product or service, but instead teach that trauma, addiction, and suicide be viewed as social justice issues.




QUALIFICATIONS AND CREDENTIALS


What are the qualifications, credentials, and licenses of the creators of the SAVE SOMEBUDDY program? This program is based on 50 years of evidence-based research by experts in social and behavioral science, medicine, trauma, and resilience such as Bessell van der Kolk, PhD author of "The Body Keeps the Score". The program outlines adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) research and evidence-based mindfulness tools that are grounded in neuroscience and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). SAVE SOMEBUDDY has been developed and refined through the expertise of a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and credentialed professionals including doctors (MD and PhD), therapists (LCSW, CMHC, LCMHC, etc.), attorneys, researchers, educators, activists, and other members of the community who are passionate about healing individuals, families, and communities. The collaborators of the program have international expertise focused on child psychiatry, clinical psychology, neuroscience, neuropsychology, social psychology, juvenile justice, law enforcement, political science, domestic and international law, mass communication, human rights, organizational behavior, educational psychology, and international conflict, instructional design, human rights communication, and internet safety for children. SAVE SOMEBUDDY has successfully implemented the program with the approval of the University of Utah Department of Psychology and Institutional Review Board. We have conducted research in school districts within the United States and among educators and activists serving refugees in other countries (see the global page on the website). We are planning to expand our research throughout the United States and around the world. Many individuals have contributed professional expertise in their respective fields toward the development and evolution of this project. A multidisciplinary collaborative team has provided a strong framework from which to advance an initiative to provide innovative trauma-informed care and enhance trauma-informed communities. For a list of our creators and Board members (including credentials and biographical information), please see the team page on the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website. SAVE SOMEBUDDY works in cooperation with other organizations to create awareness about adverse childhood experiences through providing research and psychoeducational workshops to address intergenerational trauma. SAVE SOMEBUDDY is based on findings from many years of collaborative research on social psychology, neuroscience, intergenerational trauma, and international conflict. This work has been recognized and recommended by global leaders who are experts in world conflict.




CURRICULUM


What material does SAVE SOMEBUDDY include? The SAVE SOMEBUDDY program is founded on SAMHSA's six key principles which are: 1. Safety 2. Peer support 3. Collaboration and mutuality 4. Trustworthiness and transparency 5. Empowerment, voice, and choice 6. Sensitivity to cultural, historical, and gender issues How is the program script (curriculum) designed? The curriculum is designed for ages 10-17 and is written on a 5th grade level so it can be easily learned, applied, and shared so mentors have a reference. The curriculum is available to them electronically and they may choose to print it or refer to the curriculum on an electronic device while teaching. The mentors are students or lay people from other professions that are volunteering their time. As professionals in the field of education, any suggestions or support you provide to enhance the mentors' teaching is welcomed. Mental health clinicians may only observe and are not allowed to be mentors, so other members of the community have the opportunity to make an impact. The mentors (adult and student) have your emails and may coordinate with you. The script (curriculum) with thumbnails of the slides is available under program/tools/script on the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website. How does your program address moral development issues like bullying? Read “What Happened to You?” by visiting the moral development link on the resources page on the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website. This guide was written with the expertise and under the direction of Cecilia Wainryb, PhD, who is a renowned researcher in developmental psychology and human development. She has conducted research around the world on the moral development of children in conflict, including severe forms of violence and injustice (murder, torture, forced displacement, violent communities, and extreme poverty), as well as trauma and resilience among child soldiers. According to Dr. Wainryb, this is the first publication to have integrated moral development literature and adverse childhood experiences research together.




IMPLEMENTATION IN SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS


Why would we choose this program over other evidence-based trauma-informed, suicide prevention programs that exist? SAVE SOMEBUDDY is a simple, practical, child friendly program with reachable goals. The program’s strength lies in its ability to introduce conversations, share community resources, and teach skills that everyone can use. In addition, the program is designed to provide information regarding available clinical intervention when appropriate. Many trauma-informed or suicide prevention program focus on why trauma or suicide happens and do not provide practical, evidence-based, everyday solutions that children, families, and communities can implement to address the problem. SAVE SOMEBUDDY is different because it is based in neuroscience with methods that can safely and effectively remap neural pathways, calm neurophysiology, and cultivate peer and community support. The tools that are taught can be learned and shared by everyone. What sets SAVE SOMEBUDDY apart from other school-based trauma-informed programs is the combined effort of empowerment and giving back. One hundred percent of community mentors report that being a study mentor participant was a meaningful, enjoyable, and growth-promoting experience and that they would volunteer to be a mentor again. For more information see the pilot study on the research page of the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website. How do school and community organization administrators introduce the SAVE SOMEBUDDY program to parents and teachers? Email templates are made available for school and community organization administrators when they enroll in the program to share with teachers and parents to introduce the SAVE SOMEBUDDY program. The introductions can be cut and pasted into a group email. The Program Operations Outline is provided as a separate attachment for the teachers. School and community organization administrators are responsible for distributing the consent and assent forms as part of school registration and sending the forms to parents by email prior to and after registration. Community organization leaders follow similar parameters within their organization. School and community organization administrators will work in cooperation with the assigned SAVE SOMEBUDDY project manager. The following details are to be provided for the parents, teachers, and community organization members by the school or community organization administrators: 1. The schedule outlining when the SAVE SOMEBUDDY program will be implemented at your school or community organization. (School and community organization administrators provide the program schedule in their email introduction and attach the SAVE SOMEBUDDY Operations Outline only for teachers. A separate email introduction and summary is outlined for parents. These email templates are provided in the Getting Started folder when a school or community organization enrolls in the program.) 2. An information session for parents and community organization members is to be scheduled so a SAVE SOMEBUDDY project manager can present information and answer questions. 3. Means by which parents and their child can sign SAVE SOMEBUDDY consent and assent forms as part of school or community organization registration. 4. A list of students whose parents do not consent to their child’s participation to be given to the teachers and SAVE SOMEBUDDY project manager. If parents do not want their child to participate then they must return the signature page of the consent form with their child's name and the parent’s signature stating, "My child may not participate." These students will be sent to another classroom (TBD) for alternative activities. Children who have no signed forms may remain in the classroom with their teachers and the students who are participating. 5. The consent and assent forms must stay in the secured possession of the school or community organization administrators until they are handed directly to the principal investigator. 6. A classroom and supervised activities that will be made available by the school or community organization for students who are not allowed to participate during school or community organization administered hours. 7. A list on the first day of classes of students who have or have not completed the consent and assent forms. Does the school or organization go through this process each time the school or organization wants to use this program? Once your school or community organization is a client, the school or organization can do ongoing work or refresher courses, depending on the one, three, or five year program. For schools that wish to make our program a regular offering, we also have an open-ended program. Contact info@savesomebuddy.org for more information. What would be new for students who take it year after year? We hope you use it year after year and we provide refresher courses with additional resources that include activities, which complement the skills (i.e. art, music, role playing games, acting, gaming, writing, dance, etc.). As a skills based program, SAVE SOMEBUDDY enhances and strengthens skills, and provides leadership opportunities for students as they progress from year to year. SAVE SOMEBUDDY is a research-based, neuroscience program with ongoing adjustments to curriculum. What is the schedule for implementation in a school? Student and adult mentors will be in teachers classrooms prepared to present on the dates provided by the school administration. The mentors will be wearing a SAVE SOMEBUDDY t-shirt. The program is intended to be stress free for teachers. The mentors are responsible for teaching everything, so teachers can relax, feel free to observe, and step in if they feel the desire. What time of year will the program begin for schools and community organizations? Spring - Program introductions, confirmation of enrollment, contracts, training, and University Institutional Review Board amendments and approvals will be completed from January to June. Fall - Signed consent and assent forms by email or through school or community organization registration and program implementation will take place September - November unless a contract specifies implementation to begin in October and conclude in February. Who is responsible for setting up the program slides in the classroom? Teachers are responsible for having the slide presentation up on the screen with a clicker five minutes before the beginning of the period so class can begin promptly. Each class is divided into modules. The SAVE SOMEBUDDY logo indicates a new module (listed in the bottom right hand corner of the slide). Teachers are free to review the slides if they wish. The slide presentation is available under program/tools/slides on the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website when a school has enrolled in the program. (A login and password may be required to access the program slides and script.) Are teachers and school or community organization administrators able to review the surveys before the surveys are administered to students? The surveys are validated and have been reviewed and approved by clinicians and scientists who are experts in the fields of stress reduction and trauma-informed care. If teachers or school/community organization administrators wish to review the surveys before the surveys are administered to students the teachers/administrators will be prompted to enter answers. If they want to proceed they enter 00000 as the student ID so researchers know not to include this data. They can access the surveys on the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website in the footer ( Survey 1 and Survey 2).




STUDENT PARTICIPATION


How is data collected and used by SAVE SOMEBUDDY? Data is collected through requests for information on forms throughout the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website, which is HIPAA compliant. The person requesting the information must state they have read, understood, and agree to the SAVE SOMEBUDDY Terms and Conditions, as well as the Privacy Policy. They must also state that they are 18 years of age or older to request information. These provisions are in place to protect minors and personal information. No data will be sold or used outside of the SAVE SOMEBUDDY organization and contracted partners that provide resources (yoga, dance, art, etc.), which complement skills taught in the SAVE SOMEBUDDY program. Information will only be shared with partners when an individual or organization has specifically requested information about the partner and has asked to be in contact with the partner. iKeepSafe privacy professionals conduct an assessment of products that are used or intended for use in educational settings and bring these products into compliance with federal and state privacy and children’s safety laws under the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). SAVE SOMEBUDDY data is stored on highly secured offsite servers and uses Internet classroom technology that is ​​iKeepSafe certified. For more information see the SAVE SOMEBUDDY privacy policy and terms & conditions. Why is data from student participation utilized as part of your ongoing research? This project is part of ongoing research being replicated to support educational outcomes as they relate to trauma-informed care for children. The findings from each project location add to this body of research. Adding a way to measure progress via research allows us to refine our approach to best support children and families in various communities. Are students required to participate when the program is implemented in a classroom? Students are not to be coerced in any way to participate. They may have parents that have not provided a consent form for their child to participate.These students are approved to stay in the classroom and listen to the material being shared and may or may not take part in the discussion or activities, at the discretion of the teacher. Students without assent or consent will not be given the pre and post research surveys. Those who are given parental permission to participate maintain the right to opt out of participating at any time. The University Institutional Review Board (IRB) has provided the following instruction: "The IRB does not have specific guidance on this but would defer to the teacher. There is no regulatory issue with the students who are not participating to stay in the classroom. However, if the teacher prefers these students not be present, that is their decision and should be honored." How do administrators, parents, and participants obtain informed consent? There are assent (for children to sign) and consent (for parents and adults to sign) forms that are approved by the University Institutional Review Board that are made available through your school or community organization when they enroll in the SAVE SOMEBUDDY program. How do you help parents promptly return the consent and assent forms? While there is much enthusiasm for the program, students and their parents can be slow to return their consent forms. All of the parents/guardians will be sent the consent (to be signed by parents/guardians) and assent (to be signed by youth students) forms by the school and community organization administrators via email. The parents only need to return the signature pages. Parents will be asked to complete the forms at registration and during the first week of school. This will allow ample time for the forms to be in place before the program begins. The school and community organization administrators will provide a list for teachers at the beginning of the school year showing which students have completed forms. Teachers can then follow up on the rest of the students in their class. How is declined consent handled? If parents do not want their child to participate then they must return the signature page of the consent form with their child's name and the parent’s signature stating, "My child may not participate." These students will be sent to another classroom (TBD) for alternative activities designated by the teachers or school/community organization administrators. A list of the students that are not allowed to participate will be provided to their teachers by the school/community organization administration. Students who have not returned signed forms may remain in the classroom with their teachers and the students who are participating. Students without signed forms will not be asked to complete the surveys and no data will be collected on them. How and when do students complete the surveys? Students will be taught some preliminary material prior to their taking the surveys. There are a few weeks built into the curriculum before the program tools are taught to allow students who later wish to participate to return their forms and complete the surveys. Students may complete the surveys electronically on their phones or any device with Internet access as the surveys ( Survey 1 and Survey 2) are available on the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website in the footer. Students will complete the short surveys on the first day and last day of the study schedule during the class period assigned by the school. As schools often have a limited number of computers, we ask that students be encouraged to bring and be allowed to use their phones or tablets on the day the surveys are administered. How do students participate in leadership development within the program? A few student mentors may express the desire to teach the curriculum without the aid of an adult mentor. If they have demonstrated the necessary maturity to do so, we encourage them to develop these leadership skills. Students are usually paired with an adult mentor.




SAFETY


How do you protect the safety of the students? To comply with safety guidelines, teachers must remain in the classroom with students while the mentors are teaching. If a student feels they need to talk to someone they will be directed to their teacher. Adult mentors have been appropriately screened; however, they are to stay in line of sight of the teachers. Adult mentors are never to have personal or private conversations or be alone with students, engage in personal conversations with students, or share personal contact information. These guidelines have been put in place to protect the students, school or community organization, and SAVE SOMEBUDDY. What kind of oversight is provided when the program is implemented in a school or community organization? The SAVE SOMEBUDDY (SSB) program is endorsed by University Institutional Review Board(s) (IRB), that are involved in research for this project. The IRB varies depending on the area of the world where SSB data is being gathered. The IRB provides oversight to protect the rights and preferences of students, teachers, and school and community organization administrators. What is your policy regarding background checks and two deep mentorship to protect children? Each school and community organization has its own set of rules and regulations designed to protect the safety of students. Mentors who participate in SAVE SOMEBUDDY (SSB) are required to follow strict policies and procedures for child safety and adhere to the background check process required by the school or organization that is sponsoring the program where they are mentoring. In addition, all mentors are required to complete a university-sponsored Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) certification to work with vulnerable populations. Two adults are always with the children at all times, mentors are always within line of sight of teachers, and mentors are never allowed to pair off one-on-one with students. For more information about required consent refer to the mentor consent form. Mentors complete background checks when required by the school or community organization. The following steps outline how mentors are chosen and additional requirements for training. 1. Brief interview by a SAVE SOMEBUDDY project manager 2. Orientation and program training by project manager and ethics training conducted by a licensed mental health professional 3. Agree to abide by the American Psychological Association (APA) and/or Social Work Standards of Conduct and Code of Ethics 4. Sign an SSB Volunteer Non Disclosure Agreement indicating a commitment to protecting the program materials and participant confidentiality. How is students’ identifying information protected? SAVE SOMEBUDDY conducts ongoing research and continues to refine the program for implementation in other schools, populations, cultures, etc. Surveys administered by SAVE SOMEBUDDY are confidential and are never shared with anyone outside of the research team. Researchers do not have access to identifying information so they cannot link responses to students. Additionally, teachers and administrators are not given access to the answers of students questions and cannot link student responses to the student. Parents or guardians and students may ask for help if needed and they will be directed to professionals that can meet their needs. The only identifier on the surveys is the student ID or a unique identifier. Teachers and administrators are to have student IDs or unique identifiers available if the students forget. Students are instructed to ask their teachers or administrators for their IDs so that researchers will never have the opportunity to link a student ID to a specific student. What measures are taken to protect students’ privacy when data is collected by SAVE SOMEBUDDY? Data is collected through requests for information or subscription on forms throughout the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website, which is HIPAA compliant. The person requesting the information must state they have read, understood, and agree to the SAVE SOMEBUDDY Terms and Conditions, as well as the Privacy Policy. They must also state that they are 18 years of age or older to request information. These provisions are in place to protect minors and personal information. No data will be sold or used outside of the SAVE SOMEBUDDY organization and contracted partners that provide resources (yoga, dance, art, etc.), which complement skills taught in the SAVE SOMEBUDDY program. Information will only be shared with partners when an individual or organization has specifically requested information about the partner and has asked to be in contact with the partner.

iKeepSafe privacy professionals conduct an assessment of products that are used or intended for use in educational settings and bring these products into compliance with federal and state privacy and children’s safety laws under the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). SAVE SOMEBUDDY data is stored on highly secured offsite servers and uses Internet classroom technology that is ​​iKeepSafe certified. For more information see the SAVE SOMEBUDDY privacy policy and terms and conditions in the website footer.




MENTORS AND COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS


How are adult mentors chosen and vetted to ensure they are ethically, mentally, and emotionally capable of volunteering as a mentor? Adult mentors typically volunteer because they have special interest or experience in this field. We encourage parents of students from the school or community to be trained and volunteer as mentors at no cost to the parents or members of the community. Research shows that more than 50% of adults have survived adverse childhood experiences (loss, abandonment, abuse, neglect. etc.). People who have overcome adversity often have deepened strength, empathy, compassion, and a capacity to connect with others in a profound way. People who have not survived trauma are also encouraged to be mentors as they too have valuable insights they can offer. All mentors are adults from the community that match the culture and language of the students being served (i.e. African refugee children are mentored by African refugee adults). Who recruits the youth and adult mentors? Our recruitment procedures include working with schools, parent organizations, and community organizations to create groups of youth and adult mentors to support a specified school or community organization. Recruitment happens through referrals, word of mouth, and interest generated via social media and on the volunteer page on the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website. Once they are screened and recruited, we train the youth and adult mentors about the SAVE SOMEBUDDY program and direct them as they work to help implement the program. What are the requirements to volunteer as an adult mentor? Adult mentors must meet the mentor criteria, be interviewed and approved by SAVE SOMEBUDDY qualified representatives, and comply with the training and safety requirements to mentor children through the program. The following logic model illustrates the training flow of mentors, students, teachers, and administrators to demonstrate a full community effort to support students in learning and integrating the SAVE SOMEBUDDY tools in their everyday life. The program is designed to demonstrate the viability of non-clinical community-citizens learning and implementing a trauma-informed skills curriculum with students in their community. A secondary intent is for the adult-mentors to exemplify to the youth-students the concept of one person helping one person and “paying it forward”, which can affect positive change in a community’s culture and ideology. See the Mentor Participant Logic Model, which illustrates the study phases, training timeline and flow for mentors, students, teachers, and administrators with potential outcomes. Adult mentor criteria is listed below: 1. Adults 21 years of age or older. 2. Have graduated from high school. 3. Not professionally licensed/credentialed in the mental health field. 4. Live in a geographical area where research is being conducted. 5. Commitment to traveling to the high school (study location) on a weekly basis. 6. Report no criminal background involving violence of a minor. 7. Have prior experience working with adolescents and indicate they are comfortable working with them. 8. Available for weekly curriculum trainings in person or by conference call. 9. Available to train students in a supervised classroom and introduce the study curriculum, materials, and tools. 10. Have clear communication skills. 11. Able to respect the supervising assigned teacher in the classroom setting. 12. Consent to participate in the study as a mentor. 13. Sign required forms and adhere to the IRB, School District, and school policies and procedures. 14. Fulfill CITI certification requirements. 15. Can teach and respect the ethnic background of any student or teacher. 16. Demonstrate respect for the rules and curriculum set forth by the PI and advisors. Can you be an adult mentor if you have a criminal history? If you have a criminal history you may apply to be an adult mentor. Each application is considered on a case by case basis after an interview with a qualified SAVE SOMEBUDDY representative. If approved, you must comply with the training and safety requirements to mentor children through the program.




FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS


How are donations used? How donations are used depends on whether it is a grant, cash donation or an in-kind donation. Donors may stipulate how they want their donation to be used. Donations are used to cover administrative costs and directly care for the children and families we serve because of many volunteers that share their time and resources. For more information about how to donate and where you want to direct your donation, see the donate page on the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website.
How are in-kind donations received by SAVE SOMEBUDDY? In-kind donations can be made through volunteers donating their time or entities providing products or services to support the SAVE SOMEBUDDY mission. For more information see the volunteer and donation pages on the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website. Is the cost breakdown per student or is there one price for the whole school or organization? The cost breakdown is for the whole school or organization (we base pricing on small, medium, or large schools/organizations). A cost breakdown for your school or organization can be made available by contacting info@savesomebuddy.org.




RESEARCH FINDINGS


What is the evidence that this program as a whole is effective? SAVE SOMEBUDDY is a simple, practical, child friendly program with reachable goals. Many trauma-informed or suicide prevention program focus on why trauma or suicide happens and do not provide practical, evidence-based, everyday solutions that children, families, and communities can implement to address the problem. SAVE SOMEBUDDY is different because it is based in neuroscience with methods that can safely and effectively remap neural pathways, calm neurophysiology, and cultivate peer and community support. The tools that are taught can be learned and shared by everyone. Professional clinical resources are also available for additional support when appropriate. For more information see the pilot study on the research page of the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website. The tools taught in the program have shown a positive correlation and change over time for all of the six projected learning outcomes listed below. Researchers compared pre and post intervention survey results to determine improvement for each measured outcome separately. While two or more questionnaires were designed to measure each outcome, the questionnaires were evaluated separately so a more accurate significance level could be determined for each outcome. Our research shows significance (p < 0.05) in the areas of grit, satisfaction for life, health, and resiliency using a paired samples t-test. SSB draws from four disciplines: neuroscience, medicine, psychology, and strategic communication and was influenced by the fields of human rights, political science, instructional design, and business process management. Six objectives were measured: 1) Improvement in Communication and Self-Awareness - The focus on psychology tests whether there is a measurable difference in an ability to communicate openly with self and others through self-awareness. These skills may impact school performance prior to learning the method, based on comparing performance from the previous school year and the current school year in which the information is received. 2) Improvement in Coping Skills - Students learn three simple evidence-informed tools that target behaviors and beliefs associated with self-sabotage (harm), traumatic response, and suicide prevention. Collectively, these coping skills teach how to reframe negative thoughts, breathing and self-soothing techniques to learn emotional regulation, and how to be a friend to create a supportive community. 3) Improvement in Positive Self-Perception - The component provides education about basic concepts regarding how exposure to traumatic stress can change perception, beliefs about self, and emotional response in reaction to trauma and adversity. These skills are designed to help students focus on learning and achieving life goals. 4) Form a Trusting Relationship with a Peer - Students are introduced to the concept of community building by learning how to safely reach out to support and be supported by a buddy by practicing the tools during the educational sessions. 5) Experience a Safe and Supportive Trauma-Informed School – Adult members of the community are trained on trauma-informed practices. Their role is two-fold and include: a) inspire community involvement of participants in the study and b) support students in creating a student-directed trauma-informed school community. 6) Continuous Improvement of Instructional Design – Evaluation of the instructional design methods are used to teach the aforementioned skills and tools, to determine the best implementation of the program from a human factors perspective. See the Research Study Logic Model: inputs, assessments, and potential outcomes and the pilot study on the research page of the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website for more information, which includes statistical analyses. What are the findings of preliminary studies? Many studies evaluating the dramatic rise in school-based violence, self-harm, and suicide suggest that adverse traumatizing childhood experiences contribute to lasting health, educational, and social problems throughout the lifespan (Felitti et al., 1998). Prevalent societal decline calls for an urgent solution to benefit the social and emotional welfare of the next generation by curbing the enduring effects of toxic stress and intergenerational trauma passed on through epigenetics. There have been relatively few programs implemented among school age children to educate them on how chronic stress and the emotional reactivity to these experiences can affect them (Phifer & Hull, 2016; Dorado et al., 2016). Research suggests that implementing a trauma-informed approach in schools may have social, emotional, and educational benefits for students (Howard, 2018). Furthermore, emotional self-regulation and social support may reduce violence toward self and others (Howard, 2018). Suicide most often occurs when there is a convergence of toxic stress with poor emotional and physical health sowing an experience of despair and hopelessness (Van der Kolk, 1989; Van der Kolk 2014). Self-harm can be a precursor to suicide (Van der Kolk, Perry, & Herman, 1991) that is often expressed in the form of self-sabotage and addiction (Fisher, Roget, Sage, & Sage, 2009), the slow death of the soul. A simple and replicable solution to address the destructive repercussions of trauma is imperative. The World Health Organization (WHO) states that humanity is facing a worldwide epidemic nearing 800,000 deaths by suicide annually, one death every 40 seconds (WHO, 2019; Vijayakumar, 2015; Vijayakumar, Nagaraj, Pirkis, & Whiteford, 2005). Suicide is the second leading cause of death globally among people 15-29 years of age (WHO, 2016). Research indicates 20 attempts for every adult who takes their own life, at an annual rate of almost 16 million attempts internationally (WHO, 2019; Vijayakumar, 2015) and 50–120 million people are significantly affected by the attempted suicide or suicide of an associate or loved one (Vijayakumar, 2015). Architects of genocide are becoming obsolete. Rather than killing each other, we are killing ourselves. (See pilot study) What are questions for future research? In which countries has this program been implemented? Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) related research and education regarding the long-term effects of loss abandonment, abuse, and neglect is being implemented all over the world. SAVE SOMEBUDDY has implemented the program in the United States and Greece with refugees from every continent. For more information see the pilot study on the research page of the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website. What has SAVE SOMEBUDDY accomplished internationally? Pioneering experiences in England, Northern Ireland, and Greece were instrumental to the development of this program. The lived experiences of citizens, immigrants, and refugees from multiple countries and every continent informed the SAVE SOMEBUDDY program. The program has been researched and implemented in the following areas around the world. For more information see the pilot study on the research page of the SAVE SOMEBUDDY website.

  • University of Oxford Consortium for Human Rights - Research conducted as a consortium member
  • Northern Ireland - Researched intergenerational trauma
  • Moria Refugee Camp, Greece - Trained teachers of African and Middle Eastern refugees trauma-informed care
  • Refugees and immigrants - Presented the program to leaders of these communities in Utah and taught the curriculum to refugees and immigrants in a school setting
  • At risk youth - In partnership with school districts in the United States
  • Adolescents - In residential addiction treatment centers in the United States
  • Prisoners - In and out of incarceration
  • Survivors of domestic violence - In and out of shelters
  • Soldiers and veterans - Assessed over 100 military for post traumatic stress (CAPS-5)
  • Rwandan refugees (genocide survivors)
  • Combatants for Peace - Israeli and Palestinian conflict resolution skills development
  • Developing further expansion into other parts of the world including Northern Ireland, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, and Latin America




PARTNERS AND RESOURCES


How do I become a SAVE SOMEBUDDY community partner, resource, or clinical support provider? To become a SAVE SOMEBUDDY community partner, resource or clinical support provider apply on the partners, resources, or clinical support page on the SAVE SOMESOMEBUDDY website. You can also contact info@savesomebuddy.org. A SAVE SOMEBUDDY representative will respond to answer your questions and walk you through the application process. What kinds of emotional support is available? The curriculum has been designed to relieve stress. If students feel they need support they will be referred to their teacher who can follow school policy. Mentors (adult and student) will not have personal conversations with or provide therapeutic support to students in need. They are instructed to always be in the presence of the teachers and to refer students to their teachers and school or community organization administrators. If researchers find that students have asked for support via the surveys, those student IDs or unique identifiers will be given to the school or community organization administrators so the school or community organization can follow standard procedures.




MEMBERSHIP


How old do you have to be to create an account and register with SAVE SOMEBUDDY? You must be at least 18 years of age. A parent or legal guardian may register for a child, but the account must be in the parent’s or legal guardian’s name.




CONTACT


Who do I contact if I have questions or concerns? If any parents, teachers, or school or community organization administrators have questions or concerns they can contact SAVE SOMEBUDDY Academic Director, RaeAnn Ramsey, PhD or SAVE SOMEBUDDY Executive Director and Principal Investigator, Anastasia Najarian through their staff at info@savesomebuddy.org.





___________

GET TO KNOW US

__________

YOU'RE INVITED

______________

WE'RE HERE FOR YOU

STAY INFORMED

We wish to thank the many volunteers and professionals who donated their time and resources to develop this program and website.

©2020 by SAVE SOMEBUDDY, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization. All rights reserved.

  • Instagram
  • Twitter
  • iTunes
  • Facebook
  • Spotify
  • YouTube